The One-Legged Sandpiper

"Knee deep and just a little behind"

Sunday, March 28, 1999
Through
Sunday, April 4, 1999, Easter


Number Twenty

20 Issues And Counting

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Piper twentieth issue out.

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A history of Ocean County, part one, in this issue.

First two-page Piper, this issue.

HTML lesson one in this issue.
Learn How To Create your own website.


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In like a lion
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N.J. or bust, whatever that means
www.adirondackstyle.net
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Piper Online subscription form up.

Get ready for PiperNet.

Table of Contents added to this issue.

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This issue: A History of the Ocean County Seashore.

Here's The Church. New this issue.

Here's The Steeple.

Here's The Steeple.

Coming Soon.

Travel and Geography.

Piper going to multi-page format. (Smaller page load faster).


Contents

Weather
News Sunday March 28, 1999 through Sunday April 4, 1999, Easter
A Review by Todd Johnson.
Adirondack Style furniture business related news.
Green Side Up Gardening News.
Local News and Events
Links to interesting sites.
Eastside Marketplace, Providence, RI.
Ocean Beach New Jersey.
Dip & Sip Ocean Beach New Jersey.
Real-Estate
HTML lessons. Learn how gently and thoroughly.
Here's The Church A pictorial and historical look at my home.
Here's The Steeple A look at attics and bell towers and such.
Danger Kitchen Food, cooking and eating.
Piper News News and developments related to the Piper.
Credits, sponsors and contributors.
Publishing
Download Icons.


Weather

Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Cold and rainy. Windy and raw. All day. Again.
Sunny and warm, in the 50s.
Getting warmer, almost 60.
Even warmer.
Warmest , 74 degrees, sunny and clear.
Almost raining, for the beach trip.
Warm and breezy in the morning, cold and windy in the afternoon.

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News Saturday, March 28, 1999 Through Saturday, April 3, 1999

This week saw the final adjustments to the table-saw/in feed-table alignment.
The alignment here is crucial to accurate cuts, more so then the other large tools, except the shaper.
In feed Alignment

The floor cleat for the table saw in feed table in place.
Floor Cleat

Careful adjustment of the motor/cutter-head alignment is necessary to prevent excessive wear on the two long drive belts.
Joiner Belt

The joiner blade guard in place.
Blade Guard

Wiring in the big magnetic switch, almost ready for testing.
Mag Switch

Trimming the bottom of the first curved I-beams to hold up the promenade deck overhang.
Curved I-beam

This saw is the second oldest tool in the shop, and still does a fine job despite its age.
Old Saw

Another in feed guide "pin" being bolted in place.
A 50 or so year old 1/2 inch reduction geared drill does the trick through 11 inches of wooden frame.
Drill courtesy of William H. Trautman, Lavallette, NJ. (My grandfather).
Wednesday


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A Review by Todd Johnson

Retracing Henry Hudsonís now venerable steps to the headwaters of the mighty Hudson, Julie, Todd, and Bill, set their sights on Albany, New York, where some say the river is narrow enough to jump across. There is no substantial agreement on the point, most especially from those who build the bridge that keeps those of us using I-787 from getting our feet wet. The minor point that we took the Thruway, which hardly existed when Hudson made his famous trip, meant only that it took us substantially less time, and the maps we used predated our journey and were downloaded from the Internet.

Once there, and ensconced in public parking lot number two and after having been mysteriously waved off lot one, they set about trying to figure a way to bend the space time continuum. Unsuccessful, despite the gravity of the eveningís impending activities, they waited the long while they had built into the schedule-their intention having been to give them sufficient time.

Once having successfully negotiated the cinder block catacombs that connected the parking garage with the shopping-mall-like Pepsi Arena, home of the Albany River Rats minor-league hockey club, they waited for the beginning of Stars on Ice, the tickets for which Julie and Todd had given Bill for a Christmas present. After having a lovely time watching the Zamboni operator carefully adjusting and readjusting the ice to a buttery smoothness, and watching the clowning point man meant to keep them in their seats during technical time outs, the lights were set low.

The opening that they had so keenly anticipated, brought forth upon the ice, several U.S., World, and Olympic champions, who were, separately and together, primed to entertain the substantial slice of Middle-America that temporary peopled that modern-day coliseum, where short skirts, muscular thighs, and feats of daring and beauty took the place of took the place of Christians, lions, and chariots. As anticipated Scott Hamilton stole the show with powerful and amusing skating that thrilled the crowd. Krista Yamaguchi provided a graceful foil to Hamiltonís engaging wittiness and they were all impressed by her obvious skill.

If Stars on Ice suffered from anything, it was trying to do much to please too many. Yet there was enough powerful, graceful, and compelling skating throughout the show that everyone in the crowd could find something to be pleased about. They certainly did. A standing ovation, which lasted several minutes, rewarded the skaters after their two-and- a-half hour performance.


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Adirondack Style
Outdoor Furniture

Just a few dozen pictures taken this week to expand the website. Most of the focus was in the shop. May 1, 1999 might be the date the first chair rolls off the assembly line.



The Spooning Chair on the beach.



Another slightly hazy shot. These need to be redone on a brighter day.



The Mountain-Back Bench, a twelve year old specimen.



The children's chair.


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Green Side Up

The Crocus are beginning to bloom.



No sign of the snow peas yet. Time to put in the soaker hose for daily watering.


They look good in white as well. Tulips soon.


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Just a quick ride up Route 395 in Connecticut brings you to exit 94, Attawaugan Crossing and Ballouville.


The exit ramp is covered with skid marks from empty Frito-Lay, and Cornucopia Natural food truck returning from deliveries.


Left is the new Holiday Inn, and industrial park, and to the right is Attawaugan and Ballouville.


This is my favorite local field, 100 yards from the exit ramp.
Every field has a character of its own. This one is one of the nicest, as it slowly reverts to a natural state.
Favorite Field

This log cabin's yard is usually filled with Pink Flamingos, carefully rearranged each day.
Pink Flamingos

The houses here are almost suburban looking just off the highway, just with bigger yards.
Concrete Driveway

These beautiful wetlands are located just a few feet from the suburban looking houses.
wetlands

This nice duplex was originally part of the mill housing.
Duplex

The age of the houses in the area is revealed by the duel outhouses attached to the barn behind the house.
Outhouses

The junction of Route 12, Attawaugan Crossing, and Ballouville Road with one of the smaller factory houses.
Factory

The former Attawaugan curtain company mill.
Mill

The church built for the village by the Mill in 1870.
Nice Church


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Links

This week's links are to two nicely executed Websites, one selling similar, but not competitive, items.

Another Furniture Website

Alaskan Indian Art


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The Eastside Marketplace Website will be moving from www.earthlink.net/~igyirhltd/Eastside/Eastside.htm to www.eastsidemarket.com, hosted by www.burlee.net.
Look for it there soon, and watch for fast paced developments.


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A History of the Ocean County Seashore
Part One

In September of 1609, Henry Hudson's first mate on the "Half Moon," anticipating the needs of future shore publicists, called this, "A good land to fall in with, and a pleasant land to see."

The tradition says that the Indians, amazed at the sight of these strangely bedecked men, and their gigantic ships, thought they were the Manitto or Great Spirit. They called Hudson's ship, "The Big House" or "Big Canoe." As Indian leaders gathered to meet the Europeans, Hudson offered a bottle of spirits, which at first the Indians passed, and did not drink. One Chief chastised them for this, whereupon a brave, young Indian drank heartily of the cup, and became quite intoxicated, turning around in circles.

In 1614, Capt. Hendrickson, in the Dutch ship "Onrest," Surveyed Barnegat Bay, and produced maps and charts of high accuracy.

Most of the first settlers came here from Long Island around 1700 and settled on the Bay Shore, or near the rivers emptying into it. They made a living clamming, oystering, fishing, and some by whaling. Not until around 1735 did settlement occur inland for farming and lumbering.

Early settlers were guaranteed "liberty of conscience" by the proprietors. Some were Quakers, who had met with persecution by New England Puritans. It's interesting to note we never had an established church in New Jersey because we had so many varied sects.

Those who did not live here were made to pay to use the bat. A 1792 Toms River ordinance compelled "foreigners" to pay two pence for every bushel of oysters taken in the bay, to be used for support of the poor in Dover Township.

There were many fatal shipwrecks along these shores in the 18th and 19th centuries, the lighthouses at Sandy Hook was not built until 1765, and Barnegat light not until 1834.

You hear tales of Ocean County people using lights on mules and other devices to lure ships onto the breakers, so that they could plunder them. No doubt some of these stories are true, but it is difficult to find proof. In 1846 a committee of the New Jersey legislature investigated reports of persons refusing to send assistance to victims of a wreck, and the charges were not substantiated.

In 1848 Rep. William Newell succeeded in getting an appropriation of $10,000 to provide surfboats and rockets for protection of life and property from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Harbor. Eight lifeboat houses were constructed.

In 1850 the Scottish brig "Ayrshire" ran aground north of Barnegat Inlet with 200 English and Irish Immigrants aboard. Only one life was lost. The closed life car built by Joseph Francis of Toms River was a major help.

By 1886, the Federal Government manned every station with paid crews. By 1900 there were 42 stations along the coast, on average about 3 miles apart.

Look for part two in the next issue.

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Dip & Sip



The Easter Celebration at the Dip&Sip went on as planned in spite of the lousy weather.
Here Bill and Dot Trautman, and daughter Dorothy relax after a great meal.


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Real-estate

Cabin 1

This week's real-estate Feature is a cabin for sale on Lake Alexander, just a few minutes from home.
This is one of the largest pieces of property on the lake, with its own garage.

A long shaded driveway leads to the cabin. Room enough to park 3 or 4 cars.

Cabin 2

Cabin 3

With a new roof and chimney, and recent fresh paint, the outside is ready for years.

Almost like an old Ocean Beach house porch. That's an Alexander Lake Yacht Club sticker in the window.
The lake, which is a mile wide at the widest, is over 100 feet deep in places, and has many interesting rumors and legends associated with it.

Cabin 4

Cabin 5

What a great porch this is for watching sunsets through the pine trees.

Lots of great windows for sunset watchin'.

Cabin 6

Cabin 7

The dock would need to be rebuilt. Who do we know that could do that?

The best inland sunsets in Connecticut happen here, almost everyday.

Cabin 8

Cabin 9

The property is actually a point that juts way out into the lake, forming a small cove on each side.
This is the cove on the north side, the most picturesque.

This is the south cove. Looking towards the old beach club beach. During the 20s and 30s, all the big bands used to stop and play here on the way from Hartford to Boston.

Cabin 10

Cabin 11

Looking back towards the road at the garage.

The long driveway, looking towards the road.

Cabin 12


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HTML - Lesson 1
We're going to learn HTML the right way.

The key to success in battle is to know your enemy. Step one is to get to know HTML. Where to find it, what it looks like, and how to capture it and begin to tame it to make it do your bidding. After all, Its just some statements used to arrange information into the format you would like your reader to see on their computer screen. Without HTML formatting, the Green Side Up section might look like this:

Green Side Up The Crocus are beginning to bloom.
No sign of the snow peas yet. Time to put in the soaker hose for daily watering. They look good in white as well. Tulips soon.

Click here to begin lesson one.

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Here's the Church


The following is the first part of "The United Attawaugan Methodist Church 1870-1970 100th Anniversary", a history of the church produced by the members for the centennial anniversary. You'll read it here exactly as it was written then.


Before The Attawaugan Church Was Built

Mr. Elisha Baker's wife and family took up their residence in the village of Ballouville, adjourning Attawaugan, having moved from West Thompson, where they held membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church.
On arriving at their new home, they found no church and no means of grace save occasional preaching by various independent preachers roaming about. Knowing the piety of the Baker family, someone said to the head of that household, "Mr. Baker, what will you do here without a church?" To this Mr. Baker said, "I have a little church at home, sir, and we have a prayer meeting every night." The questioner, not quite understanding what was meant, requested the privilege of attending, both for himself and neighbors. This of course, was granted, and the Baker household was too small to hold the crowds who attended.
At this stage, the Rev. Lewis B. Bates, then pastor of the church at West Thompson, was appealed to, and immediately formed the first class. This was in 1859. Mr. Bates preached once a month, with a Sabbath school of various interests being maintained. At one time the class enrolled forty-two members.
This was the beginning of the work which has been a blessing to many unto eternal life. The spirit of Worship seemed to have spread until there was such a demand for a suitable sanctuary that in the year 1870, the Attawaugan Company, who own all the mill property in several villages hereabout, generously came to the rescue and built a commodious chapel, capable of seating over two hundred persons.

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Here's The Steeple


A pictorial climb to the bell tower, a bat's eye view.

Steeple 1

Start from the shop and walk through the two large oak doors into the entry hall.
These doors are two inches thick and eight feet tall.

The colored glass in the front doors casts a nice light in the entry hall.

Steeple 2

Steeple 3

The climb starts up these narrow stairs and into what I call the Projection Room. The ceiling here is not original. The sixteen foot high space was divided into two eight foot high rooms about fifty or sixty years ago to conceal damage to the tin ceiling from the bell tower leaking. That created the "Projection Room".

The climb continues from the Projection Room up to the attic by way of this ladder. The projection room is called that because looking through the vent cut into the wall of the shop is like looking out of the camera opening in the projection room of a movie theater.

Steeple 4

Steeple 5

This double block pulley, from an old sailing ship, is used to hoist things into the attic from the entry hall through an elevator-shaft like hatch.

A variation of the Limbo is required to gain access to the attic using this ladder. This is how you know you've gained five pounds or not. There's about ten inches clearance by this beam.

Steeple 6

Steeple 7

Next issue, what this 100 year old attic graffiti says.

The top end of the hoist, secured to a 6x6 in the bell tower framing.

Steeple 8

Steeple 9

Part of the attic timbers, showing the iron tie-rods that support the 36 foot ceiling span in the shop. The damage visible is from the 1938 hurricane that blew the original bell tower down.

Looking off into the dark recesses of the attic.

Steeple 10

Steeple 11

The tower framing. Without a ladder, you have to free-climb these frames to get to the platform below the bell room.

This week's goal, the small platform right below the bell room, usually covered with bat guano.

Steeple 12


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Danger Kitchen
Fisherman's Soup*
A good boat recipe

Ingredients

> 1 10 oz can condensed split pea soup
> 1 10 oz can condensed tomato soup
> 1 10 oz can milk
> 1 12 oz can beer
> 2 6 oz cans crab meat, minced clams or tiny shrimp, or a combination of any two

How

> Put everything in a pot on the stove and heat it. Pretty easy.

All recipes original unless otherwise noted.

* From a cook book or magazine article on cooking aboard, long ago misplaced.

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Piper News How most of the Piper Icons are created.

Step One: Define the shape and outline of major Features. The shapes that receive color should be enclosed polygons to allow the Paint Fill Feature to work properly.

Start coloring the major Features. Adding detail with an enlarged (zoom) view.

Adding complete Features one at a time seems to be easier then completing all the outlines, then coloring them in.

Complete background before foreground. That allows the copy Feature to be used more easily.

Make sure and view each step in normal size before continuing. Zoom view doesn't always show off the work well.

Remember that many details may be lost if the image is reduced in size after completion. If you need only a small one, make it actual size to begin with or be prepared to edit the small version after shrinking.

Using lighter colors for foreground details creates the impression of depth, even with only a sixteen color palette.

Saving between each step is critical to recover from any possible mistakes.

The finished product, ready for use.

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The "Piper" is brought to you courtesy of
Adirondack Style Outdoor Furniture.
For None of your furniture needs ... yet.




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The One-Legged Sandpiper

The "Piper" is published using:

Microsoft Paint for Windows 98
Microsoft WordPad for Windows 98
Paint Shop Pro 5.01
MGI Photo suite 8.05
WS_FTP File Transfer Client 4.50 97.05.17


Digital photography: Polaroid PDC-300 camera
Polaroid PhotoMax
IMS Camera


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Download Icons here.


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